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Home MEATA News DOL offers $100M in grants to expand apprenticeship in high-skilled, high-growth industries

DOL offers $100M in grants to expand apprenticeship in high-skilled, high-growth industries

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December 11, 2014 - Today, the Secretary of Labor announced the long-awaited funding opportunity for the American Apprenticeship grants at a visit to the Urban Technology Projectin Philadelphia. On April 16, 2014, the President and Vice President first announced that new federal investments would be made available to support job-driven training, like apprenticeships, that expand partnerships with industry, businesses, unions, community colleges, and training organizations to train workers in the skills they need. This is the single largest Federal investment in apprenticeship history and will serve as a catalyst to "sale and scale" the apprenticeship model as an innovative workforce strategy that is relevant to a number of different industries.

The Department of Labor is making $100 million in existing H-1B funds available for the American Apprenticeship Grants to help more workers participate in apprenticeships. These grants will support public-private partnerships that promote the expansion of quality and innovative Registered Apprenticeship programs.  They will help start efforts to meet the needs of business and expand career opportunities for workers, women, underrepresented populations and young men and women of color, people with disabilities, and veterans.

Here are links to additional background information on the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) and instructions on how to apply for these grant funds:

Links to Additional Information:

Links to New Resources:

Last Updated on Friday, 12 December 2014 10:09  

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Apprenticeship Trivia

The first U.S. legislation promoting an organized system of apprenticeship was enacted in Wisconsin in 1911 and amended soon after to require that all apprentices attend classroom instruction five hours a week in addition to learning on-the-job.